Email. It may seem like something so simple that you don’t even think twice about it. But for companies these days, the email provider can be quite the big decision. Given all the talk of cloud technology these days, this could be a trend that starts to impact corporate email too, according to some in the market.

A recent report from analyst firm Gartner, www.gartner.com, Stamford, Conn., suggests Google’s enterprise Gmail is building momentum with commercial organizations with more than 5,000 seats, and presents a viable alternative to Microsoft Exchange Online and other cloud email services. Some report Gmail’s enterprise email market share currently hovers around 1%. However, says Matthew Cain, research vice president, Gartner, this represents close to half of the market for enterprise cloud email.

Cain acknowledges cloud email is still in its infancy, at 3-4% of the overall enterprise email market, but he expects it to reach 20% of the market by year-end 2016, and 55% by year-end 2020. These types of numbers would official classify cloud-based email as a growing market.

Microsoft Exchange has definitely been a staple in the enterprise with others slowly losing what little momentum they had in this area throughout the years. Gartner points to the fact Cisco closed its cloud email effort and VMware is starting to refocus some effort in this area only recently.

That being said, many may be surprised to hear just how much of a play Google’s Gmail is at the enterprise level. On the other hand, though, this developing trend should come as all that much of a shock given the way in which technologies that have long been considered more “consumerish” in nature are proliferating the business world. The recent trend of smartphones and tablets infiltrating the business world—construction included—is firsthand evidence to the fact.

Given the fact more systems are going to the cloud in construction, it’s not a stretch to think that some might be considering this model for one of the most important forms of communication within their organization. It is a trend definitely worth monitoring—and one that could have more of an impact on your company that you might initially realize.

Given all the talk of cloud technology these days, this could be a trend that starts to impact corporate email too, according to some in the market.

A recent report from analyst firm Gartner, www.gartner.com, Stamford, Conn., suggests Google’s enterprise Gmail is building momentum with commercial organizations with more than 5,000 seats, and presents a viable alternative to Microsoft Exchange Online and other cloud email services. Some report Gmail’s enterprise email market share currently hovers around 1%. However, says Matthew Cain, research vice president, Gartner, this represents close to half of the market for enterprise cloud email.

Cain acknowledges cloud email is still in its infancy, at 3-4% of the overall enterprise email market, but he expects it to reach 20% of the market by year-end 2016, and 55% by year-end 2020. These types of numbers would official classify cloud-based email as a growing market.

Microsoft Exchange has definitely been a staple in the enterprise with others slowly losing what little momentum they had in this area throughout the years. Gartner points to the fact Cisco closed its cloud email effort and VMware is starting to refocus some effort in this area only recently.

That being said, many may be surprised to hear just how much of a play Google’s Gmail is at the enterprise level. On the other hand, though, this developing trend should come as all that much of a shock given the way in which technologies that have long been considered more “consumerish” in nature are proliferating the business world. The recent trend of smartphones and tablets infiltrating the business world—construction included—is firsthand evidence to the fact.

Given the fact more systems are going to the cloud in construction, it’s not a stretch to think that some might be considering this model for one of the most important forms of communication within their organization. It is a trend definitely worth monitoring—and one that could have more of an impact on your company that you might initially realize.