Managing capital projects is a complex task that requires a close eye on every component of the project. As such, this requires a technology system that can handle the job. Back in 2008, Oracle, www.oracle.com, Redwood City, Calif., made a big move in this space when it acquired Primavera, and now it is making another big move, as it has announced Oracle Primavera Prime.

Oracle’s vision for the marketplace is to offer integrated hardware and software in all of the major enterprise applications in order to provide higher performance, reliability, and support. Oracle Primavera Prime is the first enterprise project portfolio management offering that is leveraging that tightly integrated stack of Oracle hardware and software components.

For the construction industry, this news means a complete portfolio of integrated capabilities for scheduling, resource management, project team collaboration, scope, and cost management, which will help organizations to develop and manage long-term capital projects.

The company says it will also continue to invest in its other project portfolio management applications including Oracle’s Primavera P6, Oracle’s Unifier, and Oracle’s Instantis.

Looking at the new Oracle Primavera Prime, the first module it is offering is Oracle Primavera Prime Capital Plan Management. Capabilities within this system include budget planning, project initiation governance, project costing, project selection, business process management, strategic alignment and compliance, portfolio monitoring, collaboration, mobile support, and integration with Oracle’s Primavera P6.

Many of the big capital project management systems designed for the construction industry have been acquired in recent years. Oracle’s acquisition of Skire’s Unifier and Primavera are two examples. Trimble’s, www.trimble.com, Sunnyvale, Calif., acquisition of Meridian Systems’ Proliance is another.

While acquisitions are inevitable in the construction software space, it is interesting to see how one of the parent companies is continuing to build out the product set it acquired more than five years ago.